American Badgers

 Comments Off
Jan 162013
 
American Badgers

(Taxidea taxus)  Badgers are so agressive they have been known to back down bears when confronted.  Our Badger Lotus loves frozen rats and plays with them for awhile when she is given one. Read More

American Kestrel

 Comments Off
Nov 192012
 
American Kestrel

(Falco sparverius) The American Kestrel is the smallest and most numerous of the North American Falcon.  All of our kestrels have different stories to tell but all agree they were handled by humans, making them imprinted.  The are great ambassadors in our “Zoo to You” program. Read More

Arctic Fox

 Comments Off
Nov 262012
 
Arctic Fox

(Vulpes lagopus)  Artic Foxes have the warmest fur of all the mammals.  We will always wonder how it came to be that Aurora Borealis ended up on a roof in Beverly Hills! Read More

Bald Eagle

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Bald Eagle

(Haliaeetus leucucephalus) The bald eagle, with it’s snowy-feathered (not bald) head and white tail, is the proud national bird of the United States.  We love hearing the amazing call of the eagles throughout the zoo. Read More

Barn Owls

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Barn Owls

(Tyto alba)  If you are looking for a barn owl, listen for their eerie, raspy calls, quite unlike the hoots of other owls. Read More

Black Bears

 Comments Off
Nov 262012
 
Black Bears

(Ursus americanus)  Black bears are not indigenous to Southern California. They were imported from Yosemite and introduced to the San Bernardino National Forest when the indigenous Grizzly Bear was hunted to extinction in the early 1900’s.  Our black bear have all been rescued and are happy to call Big Bear Alpine Zoo their home. Read More

Bobcat

 Comments Off
Nov 262012
 
Bobcat

(Felis rufus)  The cat is named for its tail which appears to be bobbed.  They hunt in stealth fashion and will deliver a deathblow with a leaping pounce that can cover 10 feet.  The bobcats in our care have lots of personality and are full of fun antics. Read More

Burrowing Owl

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Burrowing Owl

(Athene cunicularia) The burrowing owl lives underground in tunnels.  The owl pictured is Tremor.  He was found in a backyard in Apple Valley.  Tremor loves his mice and he charges out to get them when it’s feeding time. He is very vocal and thinks he is much bigger than he actually is. Read More

Canada Goose

 Comments Off
Nov 272012
 
Canada Goose

(Branta canadensis) The hatchlings leave the nest to follow mom into the water when they are 1-2 days old!  When Canadian Geese migrate, they form an impressive and aerodynamic “V” formation and they can cover over 1500 miles in 24 hours.   Read More

Chuckwalla

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Chuckwalla

(Sauromalus obesus) Chuckwallas live in the desert and when disturbed, a chuckwalla will wedge itself into a tight rock crevice and inflate its lungs in order to entrench itself.       Read More

Coyotes

 Comments Off
Nov 272012
 
Coyotes

(Canis latrans)   In order to avoid being detected by predators, coyotes can walk on their toes to make as little noise as possible.  On another note, coyotes can be extremely loud.  Our coyotes love to howl with our keepers and the wolves. When everyone gets going it is really something to hear. Read More

Fallow Deer

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Fallow Deer

(Cervus dama)  Unlike many deer, the Fallow deer prefer to go under an obstacle rather than jump over it.  The fallow deer in our care were confiscated by Fish and Game from someone who had them as pets.  They are now dependent on humans for their food and will live out their lives with us. Read More

Golden Eagle

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Golden Eagle

(Aquila chrysaetos) The Golden Eagle is sometimes used in Europe to hunt deer, they are so powerful.  They can go into a stoop or dive at about 150 miles per hour. Golden Eagle pairs maintain territories of up to 60 square miles, and they mate for life.     Read More

Great Horned Owl

 Comments Off
Nov 272012
 
Great Horned Owl

(Bubo virginianus) The Great Horned Owl is a very aggressive nighttime hunter and strikes from above. This is why they are sometimes called “tigers of the night.” They use their strong talons to carry animals several times heavier than they are.  Great Horned owls will also kill and eat rattlesnakes. Read More

Grey Fox

 Comments Off
Nov 262012
 
Grey Fox

(Urocyon cinereoargenteus) Grey foxes are the most cat-like of all the canids. They are the only canid that can climb trees. When the Europeans first came to North America, they tried to use Grey Foxes for their fox hunts. The foxes would go straight up a tree and escape the hunters.  Smart little foxes! Read More

Grizzly Bears

 Comments Off
Dec 052012
 
Grizzly Bears

(Ursus arctos horribilis) Grizzly bears are magnificent animals.  They  can be dangerous to humans, particularly if surprised or if humans come between a mother and her cubs.  The male grizzly can weigh more than 1000 pounds and can stand 10 feet tall. Read More

Hedgehog

 Comments Off
Nov 262012
 
Hedgehog

(Erinaceus europaeus) Hedgehogs have a coat of stiff, sharp spines. If attacked they will curl into a prickly and unappetizing ball that deters most predators. They usually sleep in this position during the day and awaken to search for food at night.  Read More

Mountain Lions

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Mountain Lions

(Felis concolor) Mountain lions require a lot of room—only a few cats can survive in a 30-square-mile range. They are solitary and shy animals, seldom seen by humans.  Mountain Lions are extremely agile creatures. Their long hind limbs allow them to cover a distance of 40 feet in a single leap.  Read More

Mule Deer

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Mule Deer

(Odocoileus hemionus) Mule deer antlers “fork” as they grow.  The average male deer weighs 200 pounds and the female deer weighs 150 pounds. Deer kill about 150-170 people each year, from car accidents, and because people underestimate how dangerous they really are. Read More

Opossum

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Opossum

(Didelphia virginiana)  These animals are most famous for “playing possum.” When they are threatened, Opossums can actually shut down their body systems and pass out. Green foul smelling foam also comes out of their mouth. This usually puts a predator off and they will leave the opossum alone.   Read More

Peregrine Falcon

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Peregrine Falcon

(Falco peregrines)  Peregrine Falcons can fly as many as 15,500 miles per year.  Peregrines hunt from above, and after sighting their prey, drop into a steep, swift dive that can top 200 miles an hour. They are the fastest bird on the face of the earth! Read More

Porcupine

 Comments Off
Nov 272012
 
Porcupine

(Erethizon dorsatum)  Porcupines are the second largest rodent in North America, the beaver being only slightly larger.  The porcupine has 30,000 and more quills on its body, which are actually modified hairs.  Porcupines have no fur on the bottoms of their feet, this helps them to climb trees.   Read More

Raccoon

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Raccoon

(Procyon lotor) Raccoons are plantigrade animals, walking on the entirety of their foot – heel to toe. Bear and humans do this as well.  Raccoons are highly intelligent and have a manual dexterity that comes close to that of apes. Their long delicate fingers easily open trash cans and doors. Read More

Raven

 Comments Off
Dec 032012
 
Raven

(Corvus corax) These sleek, black birds are excellent and acrobatic fliers on par with falcons and hawks. They are very intelligent and sometimes cooperate to flush out prey when hunting.     Read More

Red Fox

 Comments Off
Nov 272012
 
Red Fox

(Vulpes vulpes)  Red foxes come in many different color phases, anywhere from a light yellow to a black phase. They remain this color all their lives.  All red foxes have a white tip on their tail.  Read More

Red Shouldered Hawk

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Red Shouldered Hawk

(Buteo lineatus) Red-shouldered Hawks return to the same nesting territory year after year. One Red-shouldered Hawk occupied a territory in southern California for 16 consecutive years. Read More

Red Tailed Hawk

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Red Tailed Hawk

(Buteo jamaicensis) As they circle and soar, they can spot a mouse from 100 feet up in the air—about ten stories high. Read More

Red Tegu

 Comments Off
Dec 032012
 
Red Tegu

(Tupinambis rufescens)  Tegus can run on their hind legs.  They are highly intelligent, learning to recognize their owners, becoming docile and in some cases even ignoring food in favor of social interaction and they love to swim. Read More

Ringtail

 Comments Off
Dec 032012
 
Ringtail

(Bassariscus astutus) Ringtails were kept as pets by miners in Big Bear during the gold rush era. Read More

San Joaquin Kit Fox

 Comments Off
Nov 272012
 
San Joaquin Kit Fox

(Vulpes macrotis mutica) Kit foxes appear to be able to survive without drinking water. This is an adaptation to living in desert conditions where they get almost all of their water from their prey. Read More

Sandhill Crane

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Sandhill Crane

(Grus canadensis) During mating, pairs vocalize in a behavior known as “unison calling.” They throw their heads back and unleash a passionate duet—an extended litany of coordinated song. Read More

Snow Leopard

 Comments Off
Oct 102014
 
Snow Leopard

(Uncia Uncia)  What does the snow leopard eat?   Snow leopards eat meat.  They primarily hunt wild sheep and goats. Snow leopards are also known to eat smaller animals like rodents, hares and game birds.   How long do they live?    Snow leopards have been known to live up to 21 years in captivity.  In Read More

Snowy Owl

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Snowy Owl

(Nyctea scandiaca) Snowy owls have keen eyesight and great hearing, which can help them find prey that is invisible under thick vegetation or snow cover. Read More

Turkey Vulture

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Turkey Vulture

(Cathartes aura) When harassed, they will regurgitate their stomach contents of rotten meat, which is usually enough to deter predators because of its putrid smell. Read More

Wolf

 Comments Off
Dec 132012
 
Wolf

(Canis lupus) Wolves are legendary because of their spine-tingling howl, which they use to communicate. Wolves have a very complex communication system which includes body language and scent marking as well as vocalizations.   They use this communication system to send messages to each other, their pack and other packs and animals nearby. Read More